Annual Conference

June 23rd - 28th, 2015

Westfield State University 

Westfield, MA

AGS holds an annual conference the third week in June. This conference, held in a different location each year, features lectures, demonstrations, exhibits, conservation and documentation workshops, classroom sessions, slide presentations, and guided cemetery tours. The 2015 AGS Conference will be held at Westfield State University in Westfield, Massachusetts from June 23rd - 28th.

Our 2015 Conference is less than three months away...

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE

Or download the Conference Registration form located at the top right side of this page.

Westfield State University is a small, compactly organized campus, located on level terrain.  For views of the campus, go to:  http://www.westfield.ma.edu/about/campus-facilities.

LODGING:

On-campus Lodging:  Conferees will stay in University Hall, a recently constructed, air-conditioned residence hall.  Rooms are in 4-person and 6-person suites.  Within the suites, there are single and double rooms.

Off-campus Lodging:  For those who wish to stay off-campus, there are a number of hotels and motels to choose from in Westfield and West Springfield, a short (10-20 minute) drive from the Westfield State University campus.

PROGRAM NOTES:

Nick Bellantoni, retired Connecticut State Archaeologist and a good friend of AGS, will be the lead-off speaker on Wednesday evening.

Evening Lectures will be held in Wilson Hall.  A list of presentations will soon be posted here.

Classroom Participation Sessions and Late Night are scheduled for Ely Hall -- additional information tba.  

Workshops:

     Conservation Workshop, Field Session:  Saturday June 27, location and additional details tba.

     Photography Workshop:  Saturday June 27 -- bring your camera, extra batteries and/or a charger.

Bus Tours:  see the Spring 2015 issue of the AGS Quarterly for a feature article about the bus tours.

On our conference bus tours, we will provide several opportunities to sample the range of gravestone forms, styles and materials characteristic of the lower Connecticut Valley and southern Berkshire County, from the Colonial era, to present.  We have planned a Wednesday bus tour to Berkshire County (that's marble country) and Friday bus tours to cemeteries in the Springfield area -- a Connecticut Valley Sandstone tour and a Metro-Springfield tour -- along with a Berkshire Hills tour in the uplands west of the conference site. 

Self-guided Tours:  information will be posted a few weeks before conference time

LONG DISTANCE TRAVEL INFORMATION:    

By air -- Bradley International Airport, which serves the Hartford/Springfield area, is the nearest airport

By rail -- the Amtrak Vermonter provides daily service from Washington D.C. to Union Station in Springfield, and beyond

By bus -- Peter Pan Bus Lines, based in Springfield, serves much of the Northeast corridor; the Springfield Bus Terminal is located a short distance from the Railway Station 

For local bus service from the Springfield Bus Terminal to Westfield State University: 

http://www.pvta.com/schedules/R10.pdf

We’ll offer more details in the next issue of the AGSQuarterly, in our e-Newsletter and here on the AGS website.

We hope to see you in Westfield in June

Westfield is situated in the Connecticut River Valley, a few miles north of the Massachusetts/Connecticut border.  Originally part of Springfield, it was among the earliest English settlements in western Massachusetts.  In Westfield, as elsewhere in the lower Connecticut Valley, gravestones were made from sandstone during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, but by the 1820s, marble markers and monuments were becoming increasingly popular.   Much of the marble came from quarries in Berkshire County, just east of the Massachusetts/New York border.  During the opening decades of the nineteenth century, as descendants of the English settlers joined the westward migration, immigrants from Ireland arrived in increasing numbers, providing much of the labor force for the burgeoning industrial revolution.  Immigrants from other parts of Europe and from French Canada soon followed, and once established, each ethnic group established private sectarian cemeteries.   On our conference bus tours, we will provide several opportunities to sample the range of gravestone forms, styles and materials characteristic of the lower Connecticut Valley and southern Berkshire County, from the Colonial era, to present.   

 

The Association for Gravestone Studies
Greenfield Corporate Center
101 Munson Street - Suite 108
Greenfield, MA 01301

413.772.0836 | info@gravestonestudies.org

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